What Should I Do to Keep My Sauna Clean Inside?

What Should I Do to Keep My Sauna Clean Inside?

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A clean sauna is a happy sauna. 

Just like any other piece of equipment, regular routine cleaning & upkeep will ensure you get to enjoy optimal working conditions, as well as its benefits and features for years to come.

Cleaning a sauna is also fairly easy to do. There isn’t a need to remove or replace anything, and you certainly don’t need to expose yourself to any harmful chemicals. 

For the most part, cleaning an infrared sauna is very low maintenance. 

We’re here to share with you an in-depth guide on how to clean a sauna so you can enjoy amazing health benefits and keep costs down for a long time coming. 

Let’s dive in.

 

Sauna Cleaning & Maintenance

As mentioned earlier, cleaning a sauna is very low maintenance.

However, there are some things to keep in mind when cleaning.

We recommend a quick cleaning of the sauna each time you use it, and also doing a more in-depth clean every 2 weeks or so.

For quick cleaning, we suggest wiping down the interior with a damp washcloth after each use. Doing so will help prevent the buildup of minerals on the wood due to sweat and perspiration. 

Using distilled or filtered water, as opposed to tap or unfiltered potable water is recommended because this will prevent any minerals from building up over time on the wood. 

For a deep clean, scrub down the sauna with warm water and even use fine-grit sandpaper to remove some of the more ingrained stains, including sweat stains and deep water stains.

Make sure not to have the sauna operating while you clean. Ensure that the unit is turned off. Also, be sure to have the doors open to facilitate proper air ventilation. 

If you notice a lot of dirt and debris in your sauna, simply use a handheld vacuum cleaner or a broom to remove any loose particles.

Vacuum or broom before you initiate in the cleaning process because dry dirt & debris is easier to remove.

 

Sauna Cleaner

If you’re about to reach for that bottle of bleach to clean your infrared sauna, there’s no need. 

The only reason that you may need to use bleach to clean is if you discover mold developing on the wood. Mold develops as a result of the moist environment, which both mold and bacteria can thrive in.

With proper cleaning, you can avoid the development of mold, to begin with.

Additionally, the use of cleaning agents may also absorb into the wood, causing unwanted stains and odors.

While there are sauna cleaning products on the market, one great way to save money and customize your own sauna cleaner is to make your own.

 

To make your own sauna cleaner:

  1. Find an empty water bottle or large bowl
  2. Fill the water bottle or large bowl with warm water, but leave some room at the top
  3. Add a few drops of high-quality essential oil including Tea Tree, Eucalyptus, Arborvitae, Lavender, or Lemon.
  4. Add 1 tablespoon of baking soda
  5. Shake the bottle or stir the solution
  6. Spray onto the interior and lightly scrub the wood. 

 

Make sure to scrub the sauna bench, walls, backrests, ceiling, floor, and anything else made of wood that can be cleaned.

 

How to Clean the Sauna Bench

The bench is a section in the sauna that collects the most sweat and perspiration due to sitting on it, therefore it’s imperative to really clean this area well. Be sure to vacuum and clean on a regular basis.

 

How to Clean the Sauna Floor

Like the sauna bench, the sauna floor is an area that also collects a lot of sweat, perspiration, and dirt from the constant foot traffic.

 

How to Clean the Sauna Walls

The sauna walls, although not an area that gets as much attention as the bench or the floor, still gets dirty and needs to be cleaned regularly.

When people lean against the walls or touch the walls with their hands, sweat can get on the wood and cause a buildup of minerals if not cleaned.

 

How to Clean the Sauna Heater

When cleaning the sauna heater, it’s recommended to use a vacuum and only use a cloth to wipe and debris, fingerprints, or any dirt you may see. Spraying the heater with liquids may cause the heater to not work properly.

 

Using a Towel in the Sauna

Using a towel in the sauna isn’t just sanitary, it helps with the overall sauna maintenance. As sweat and perspiration get absorbed into the wood, that means more cleaning from you. 

Having a towel handy to absorb the moisture means that less sweat gets on the floor and bench, helping to extend the life of the unit and in theory, clean less.

Placing a towel on the ground under your feet and where you sit on the bench helps to absorb the maximum amount of perspiration. When deciding on a towel, you want one with great absorption qualities. Our soft and comfy Health Mate towels are designed with this in mind.  If you’re looking for something a little more functional than a towel, there’s always our absorbent terry cloth robe!

 

Takeaways

Cleaning your sauna on a regular basis while using the proper sauna cleaners, methods, and overall maintenance tactics will help to extend the life of your unit for years to come.

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